About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
to do. my mom was always taught my colleagues be for we came out, used as an expression. she would say chile, you're defined by your courage and you are redeemed by your loyalty. you're defined by your courage and redeemed by your loyalty. in the four years i've serve here, and were i still and the senate serving out that term, i would be senate pro tempore which is the seniormost senator roe, which is a frightening thought to think i'm that old. but i never met a man, or woman, in that period with as much physical and moral courage as daniel inouye. i never met a man with as much loyalty to his country, to his family and to his friends. some who served with him a long time remember he's one of the few people who stand on the floor to defend a colleague who was under siege, without ever considering the political consequences for him back home. he always just did the right thing. he always had the moral courage to do the right thing your hundred and. he had a compass that always directed him, and he was resolved to do truly extraordinary things. things that few women and men ever contem
and the uk government on following the lead of the scottish government and scottish parliament in its using equal marriage minimum pricing for alcohol and previously on the smoking ban. given the fact that unemployment is now lower in scotland than the rest of the uk, will he follow the lead of the scottish government by introducing a more shovel-ready measures for economic growth? >> i think what the honorable gentleman will find is because of the measures taken in the autumn statement, there's an extra 300 million pounds for the scottish government to spend, so if they want to spend that on shovel-ready measures they can. but i certainly am happy to say that when good policies are introduced in any party, in the united kingdom to i think we all have the opportunity to follow them. >> order. statements, the prime minister. >> here on c-span2 we will leave the british house of commons now as they move onto other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's questions time era questions time error of life wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern of parliament is in session. you can see thi
are ubiquitous parts of our communications system. they came about because of the use of unlicensed spectrum. the lot advances the use in several ways of allowing the fcc to use existing white spaces in the broadcasts than for unlicensed use, gives the sec the authority to reorganize the existing white spaces to maximize their value and perhaps most important it allows the fcc to create guard bans in the repurchased broadcast television spectrum that may be used for new unlicensed services like super why 5. this is smart spectrum policies that recognizes the increasingly interdependent nature of licensed and unlicensed operations. the bands will enhance the value of the spectrum to be auctioned by protecting it from interference and create a nationwide ban to prime spectrum that can be used for new innovation in unlicensed use. that is why i am pleased the fcc's proposed rules are faithful to congressional intent to promote innovation in unlicensed use. second, the law preserves the fcc's ability to use auction rules to promote competition in the wireless industry while insuring no single ca
to be the best solution for us, the other test is a bio markers tests and that is an indication of the effect of growth hormone on the body and since those effects of last much longer than the growth hormone is actually there the window of detection is much broader and the other two tests currently in development. >> did trials include a wide range of individuals with a wide range of body types? >> yes, it did. >> as the test gone through the peer review process and what were the results of that process? >> as i mentioned the test has had four publications related to the test itself published in the peer review literature. the bio markers test has had 33 publications weighing the background for the tests and again those are in. the literature. quite a bit of research has been done over the last 15 years. >> thank you. mr. chairman, just yesterday the committee received a letter from scott blackman of the u.s. olympic committee stating, quote, given the stringent review process, the utmost confidence in the approved testing methods to detect h. g. h. and i ask unanimous consent to answer this
with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder, experience the rapes, those are routine. iranian officials are involved in that activity but also in massive corruption preventing humanitarian assistance, food and medicine from reaching the iranian people, they are the beneficiaries of some of this and this new amendment would authorize the administration
some of us here today. if you were age 16 to 25. it can be -- [inaudible] to suggest 28 pounds and give you a train fare. it's not just fantastic -- [inaudible] must be taken by us and promoted by us. instead of us spending another year on the unrealistic campaign. finally, as a whole country, we have an public transport service. of course, there are going to be problems with it. we are human after all. let's stop complaining and focus other campaign -- [inaudible] vital, valuable and realistic this year. a review of the curriculum -- [inaudible] we do not need transport at the campaign. if you are unhappy go and do something about it. make it change locally. so nationally we can bo focus on another more effective campaign. so i plead with you here today to not vote for the u.k. parliament campaign for the next year to be made public transport cheaper, better, and acceptable for all. think. do you want an effective curriculum to prepare us for life? teach us about politics? [inaudible] education and [inaudible] which can be achieved in a year? or do you want to drag out the campaign mak
>> for state department officials resigned after reports for lack of security at the u.s. benghazi, libya. wittiest ambassador and three other americans were killed. at 8 a.m. eastern the senate foreign relations committee, we will have that on c-span2. later in the day, we will head over to the house side of the capitol. we have live coverage at 1 p.m. eastern here on c-span3. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every of them appear, probably will never happen again in history. it's interesting because after dad was sworn in we went in and took a picture, photo of the family behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexander virginia, suburbia, munich, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we been living there. dad was vice president. i've never forget that night mom was co
about some of the problems in the persian gulf region because that's a vital interest to us. the straits of hormuz, persian gulf, or the swiss canal are blocked in any way they could have devastating impact on the united states because we still get a large part of our energy from the region. i traveled to azerbaijan an armenian in early september. and i also stopped in georgia and met with the president. when i talked to these leaders, iran was one of the things that came up at the very beginning, because they'll feel the influence and the aggressive attitude underneath cover so to speak of iran. in particular, i think azerbaijan feels a great deal of concern, and when i talked to the president, members of parliament and others, it was readily apparent to me that they thought that there ought to be closer ties between azerbaijan and the united states, and georgia, and hopefully armenia. because iran is really trying to destabilize or undermine those governments are we believe that is their long-term goal. iran has been involved in terrorism as we know for some time. it's partly unique in
a city transit system where you don't have adequate capacity and passengers to use that facility, the same thing holds true anymore with passenger service. when i heard president obama and this administration, beginning to promote high speed rail, unfortunately most of the money, the $10 billion, does not go for high-speed rail. they chose instead to support almost 150 projects and that number is growing and a lot of that money has been left behind. in fact, most of the money that has been read dedicated to high speed rail has been sent back by states including my state, the state of florida, we had to switch a proposal for high-speed rail, the actual speed was 84 miles an hour. 84 miles for one hour transit the distance of the proposed link in central florida, that is not high speed. high speed -- by our definition, 110 miles per hour average. that doesn't mean the train gets up to 110, 150, 116 miles for some stretch. we are talking about the average speed. we are talking about a switch in ohio, looking at 39 miles to 58 miles an hour. that money was turned back. there was a si
welcome to our friends at c-span and the other media outlets who are with us tonight. we have a lot of special guests in the audience today but i want to single out a special welcome to senator mike reed who is a good friend of the national archives, senator reed from utah. [applause] who himself clerked for a future supreme court justice, judge alito when he was at the u.s. court of appeals on the third circuit. welcome. on monday the constitution of the united states turned 225. tonight's program is one of several that the national archives is presenting this month in celebration of the founding document, signed in philadelphia on september 17, 1787. tonight we are honored to welcome two distinguished guests to explore the past, present and future of united states constitution. our partners for tonight's program in honor of those of the constitution are the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thanks for the opportunity to collaborate with you this evening. the declaration of independence was long heralded as the icon of our independence to nationhood.
some things about republicans attempt use nuclear options and judgments i agree with. let me emphasize that this is a radical step it has taken. this will require breaking the, steamrolling the parliamentarian. and i must tell you i've been very disappointed in the reporting of this issue which tends to use a kind of cost and shorten over matters making it appear as if this is something that anytime can be done by a majority. they just haven't elected to before. that's not the case. it's very clear in senate rules if you challenge a ruling constitutional, that challenge is debatable and the debate itself can be filibustered. but what they're going to have to get in this case, senator calls for a point of order suggesting the filibusters unconstitutional. is ignore the parliamentarian who will say can be debated and steamrolled over the parliamentarian and basically break their own rules by not allowing debate. ornstein also argued quote basically the essential character of the senate in the system, the republican form of democracy trying to avoid the emotions of the majority is to prov
realizes when he has a gun, he or she, it is a huge responsibility. if you use this weapon irresponsibly or wrongly you could get yourself in legal trouble, you could cause unnecessary death, you did not intend to harm to, makes you very careful. it should make you very careful and for most people it does but it would make people more careful if they all had to pass some kind of test before they get licensed. >> before you can drive a car. >> you don't always have a gun in many localities. >> former new york times editor craig whitney on the history of gun ownership and then control in america from living with guns:a liberal's case for the second amendment saturday night at 10:00 eastern on booktv's afterwards, part of four days of nonfiction books and authors on c-span2. >> democratic senator daniel inouye died monday at the age of 88. the senate's senior member was serving his seventh term. tribute continued yesterday. this portion is an hour. >> first, my friend, chairman of the judiciary committee has been honored to receive one of the senate's high honors in the senate, i congratula
be impartial. all that baggage i simply bring with us. this point stop me at some conference. that conference. outpointed and. the poetry world is a small one, a subculture of subculture. how are we to read the work of our peers, some of whom we shared bathrooms and cubicles and sandwiches with. to read thousands and thousands of lines of poetry over the course of the summer is as it turns out to drink from the leaf. .. >> that i am one person, that i will live and die alone, that i will only ever inhabit this one consciousness. i was wrong about this too. to read this poem was to be in conversation with a level deeper than who we are, where we are and what our homely words and thoughts and deeds and lives don't mean. still, enduring merit, until this summer did i even believe in it? did i simply believe enduring merit could never be agreed upon, that all things are relative and, therefore, can not be said to have merit and their endurance cannot be predicted? if so, i no longer believe it or even remember believing it. these five radioactive books glowed green and dustless among the others.
to join us for one of the photos so that we can include them in one of the photographs. and take more than 5 or 10 minutes to get that done but we would like to invite everyone and put everyone on notice that we will try to get triple notification out to everyone for that. this hearing is a continuation of the last full hearing of the committee, please to have chaired the committee during the past 20 some months and focus on our transportation needs and requirements. the very first hearing that i held as chairman was january 27th. it was a field hearing in grand central station and it focused on the same issue, development of the northeast corridor and high-speed rail. this hearing is also part of a series of hearings that examines the operations of our primary transportation long distance and high-speed carrier which is amtrak and as you know, i have been one of the most vocal critics of amtrak and its operation but guy consider myself one of the strongest proponents of high-speed rail, inner-city passenger service, commuter and mass transit in the congress and in the united states but wh
have a corporation which is me and linda, so that has funds that i can use for all of this stuff. and i do spend, you know, why do it if you're not going to do it thoroughly? i couldn't have done this trip without that kind of a team put together. so, you know, it's not like you get an advance and then go spend it all on vacation. a lot of it goes into the work of making the book. >> the family connections, the obama family connections, as a passive observer, my head is spinning. i don't know who is who. >> okay. that's going to be a challenge for me, to come in this book, for a couple of reasons. one, it's a fairly complicated family web. and the second reason, which is unavoidable is that kenyan names read by readers in the united states can sound, you know, different and harder to remember who is who, et cetera. so i have to be able to deal with that, ma and that's a challenge for any writer. i get some ways i done in the past. you know, essentially what's important to me is not quoting somebody. when you write a long narrative, you're not putting together a string of quotes, this pe
>> [inaudible conversations] >> c-span3 has live coverage of a hearing on the use of the human growth hormone in the nfl. live coverage of the house oversight committee begins at 10 a.m. eastern. later, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke holds a news conference following a meeting of the
striking when you look at it is that the prosecution of this conflict has come with us keeping the government of pakistan is much as possible in the dark and over the objections of the government of pakistan.@@@p@@@@@@@@@@@@@
on the other side with to stamp use is up 40% in two years in the middle of a recovery. 41 states had more food stamp expenditures last year over the year before. there are things to be had but in terms of subsidies it is not like they get a check kumbaya they get the same deduction but it is a different business and that is one of the things to help in the united states. so to encourage production here is a smart thing. i suspect those things are on the table but the big it loophole is the home mortgage and no taxes on health insurance and charitable giving are the big three. that will be the interesting debate. . .
in the u.s.. use -- an independent national anti-doping agency for olympic, paralympic and american sports in nine states. the mission is to protect and preserve the health of athletes, the integrity of competition and the well-being of sports through the elimination of doping. for senator lugar. i've often joked with him that he's been my secretary of state while i've served here in the united states senate because you could count on senator lugar to give good, unbiased advice on complicated foreign relations issues. and we will very much miss senator lugar's voice here in the united states senate and also his better half, char lugar, who i think we all know is a bright light. so, senator lugar, it has been an honor and a privilege to serve with you, and i know that your voice will continue to be heard on the important issues of the day. so thank you for your service to our country and to your state, and thank you for being a good friend to me. mr. president, we have this long tradition in the senate of senators giving farewell remarks. i want to alert colleagues that mine will be especia
is an insular . >> discreet. >> insular minority. so but nobody bothered us. i was the only black kid in my seminary 1965. '64 there was another young man. i was there by myself for two years in savannah. nobody bothered me. i hear people say these things about their tolerance. there are identifying who is what a lot more. the -- i kind of like the idea that when you started, here you and i, neither one of us is caucasian. nobody is pointing it out. we pointed it out and said you are indian dissent. i don't know what people say. people say horrible things. i'm not black, so i'm a little doubtful i should say i'm black, you know. [laughter] but, i mean, here we are. nobody one is bringing it up. i think what you should be more concerned about is where we are we are the ivy leagues nap seems to be more relevant. but even with that, even with can nitpick all of it. these are good people. these are people who i go back to what i said, they are continuing what was started 200-years ago the great debate. they are good people. i mean, i sit next to justice ginsburg, how often we agree? >> [laughte
and keep sports safe, written with marc hyman who is with us here today as well. so dr. cantu, what is the central thesis of your book here? >> first of all time i would like to thank you in the aspen institute for convening this conference today and for inviting me to participate in it. i think before i answer your question, i would like to start i just simply saying i am pro-sports. i want every sport to be continued and i wanted to be played in greater numbers, and i believe all of the opinions that i hold are trying to have that happen although right now maybe not everybody fully believes it. football's value is the exceptional exercise obtained in playing it. the last time i checked, it was the minutes if not hours of physical activity playing the sport that counts, not the milliseconds of bashing heads. as for the medical director of the national center for catastrophic sports injury research, we track catastrophic sports injuries in this country. 97% of which comes from the sport of foot wall or 96.9 to be precise. and that is even before you start to get into the concussion
and often would use a proxy power in the committee's to have one person showed up in every amendment even the good ones just because they cut so it's not as if we are looking at angels verses devils, but there is a difference. and one way to express that difference is if you look at what happens after 2000, george w. bush gets elected no coattails at all and in a very weakened position. >> that is a popular vote. >> it would have been easy for democrats to stomp all over him right from the beginning and basically damage the weakened presidency. the first thing he pushed to initiatives when he got there. no child left behind and tax cuts they move through in a model bipartisan fashion with the impetus coming from george miller and ted kennedy the fact is that in doing so they gave legitimacy to bush and made his presidency stronger. democratic votes enabled those to go through whether you like them or don't like them than we had 9/11 and rallying by both parties behind a range of legislation some of which was controversial but almost unanimous support. and then you move on into the t.a.r.p
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)